Flinders House

Victoria

The undulating landscape of the Mornington Peninsula is formative in the design for this family retreat. Its curvature, in plan and elevation, reflects the rolling, gnarled terrain of its natural surrounds. Sited just below a ridgeline, it is read in the landscape as a singular sculptural form, yet it is impossible to read any single elevation at once.

The approach to the house, up a winding driveway, gradually reveals elements of the structure. At the entry point, a monolithic earthen wall reveals a door through which the home and its vista unfold in a series of revelations, much like the progression of spaces in a rambling country farmhouse. Heavily textured stone white walls echo the weathered and austere coastal environment and deeply recessed windows framed in charcoal timber emphasise their thickness.

Internal spaces follow the lead of the exterior, with a sinuous walkway forming the backbone of each of the two boomerang-shaped volumes. The main ‘public’ living area, an expansive volume with a subtly raked ceiling, arcs outwards to the view, while more intimate areas – a sunken living pod and bedrooms – are independently cocooned, their own views framed more specifically. Reinforcing this distinction, a subdued palette of stained timbers, stone grey concrete and muted whites causes the architecture to recede in areas where the view dominates, while smaller spaces are infused with colour and luxuriant finishes. 

  • Australian Institute of Architects, Victoria - Flinders
  • Australian Institute of Architects, Victoria - Flinders
  • Flinders House
  • Architecture Australia Mar/Apr 2013

Flinders House

Reclining into the ridgeline, reflecting the gnarled coastal terrain